Screen Shot 2015-05-20 at 21.16.11Thanks to a great friend in Germany who posted a comment last night about another strike of train drivers in Germany, I found out from bahn.de this morning that the train I was going to get from Frankfurt Airport back to Hamburg tonight had been cancelled. When I checked I found out that there were no more rental cars available at the airport. So I had to book another flight going directly to Hamburg (which I hadn’t done to save money) and cut my stay in Ireland (and work) short by a few hours. Looking on the bright site, it’ll give me a few hours of sleep tonight before getting up at about 2am to get ready for the drive to Diepholz.

imagesNot to worry if you haven’t heard of Diepholz. Neither had I. In fact, I’m a tiny bit nervous about going to the ‘right’ Diepholz. Google Maps tells me that there is only one, but I find that hard to believe. We’ll just have to chance it.

The Diepholz we’ll be driving to is about 2 hours south of Hamburg (most places in Germany are South of Hamburg, except, maybe, Tating) and we’re going there because it’s from Diepholz Hauptbahnhof that our special train will depart at 5:53 tomorrow morning, and we were advised to be there about an hour before that, i.e. at 4:53 – approximately.

We’ll be arriving in Lourdes on Friday morning at 10:22 – I am still at awe at the ability of the train companies to calculate these times to the minute. Unless, of course, the driver of that train from Diepholz has decided to go on strike in the meantime too – to be honest, I hadn’t thought about that possibility until right now…

For years, we walked parts of the camino around Easter, a few days at a time. Instead of a long walk, we’ll be going on a long train journey to a place I remember as being very special. For Pádraig and for us, this will be the first long, not-hospital-related journey for almost two years. We’ll be back in Hamburg the night before his birthday, which we will celebrate in style and, again for the first time in almost two years, outside of a hospital.

Think about this – it sounds like we’re about to join life again. Not fire-fighting, not worrying constantly.